Title: Grandmothers For Peace
Fandom: Wonder Woman
Rating: G
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Diana & Etta
Warnings/Content: Future fic, protests
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: 1958, The Atomic Research Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston

Also at the Archive

Grandmothers For Peace )

Title: Wuthering Heights
Fandom: Riverdale
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Cheryl Blossom/Jughead Jones, Cheryl Blossom/Veronica Lodge, Jason Blossom
Warnings/Content: Canonically dead character
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Cheryl wished people would be more accepting of her brother.

Also at the Archive

Wuthering Heights )

Title: Under the Sycamore Tree
Fandom: Twin Peaks
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Dale Cooper/Audrey Horne
Warnings/Content: Post-S2, The Black Lodge
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: After the explosion, Audrey finds herself in an unfamiliar place.

Also at the Archive

Under the Sycamore Tree )

Title: For Services Rendered
Fandom: The Retired Angel of Death
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Brittany
Warnings/Content: Post-canon, future fic, alien world, seafood
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017. The Retired Angel of Death is a sci-fi short story by Jamie Lackey, about a retired assassin who takes up food blogging and travel. You can read it here: The Retired Angel of Death.

Summary: Brittany has no problems eating meat.

Also at the Archive

For Services Rendered )
Title: Subtraction
Fandom: Person of Interest
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Joss Carter/Zoe Morgan/Sameen Shaw
Warnings/Content: Canon character death, mourning, threesome
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Vengeance might feel good but it doesn't make things right.

Also at the Archive

Subtraction )

Title: Recovery
Fandom: Person of Interest
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Root/Shaw
Warnings/Content: Sickfic, Root lives, post-series
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Shaw says she has no bedside manner, even though she hasn't left Root's side since the shooting.

Also at the Archive

Recovery )

Title: Favours
Fandom: Person of Interest
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: John Reese/Kara Stanton
Warnings/Content: Pre-series, canon-level violence,
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Kara loves to show John just how much she cares.

Also at the Archive

Favours )
Title: Aftershock
Fandom: Agents of SHIELD
Rating: G
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Leo Fitz/Framework!Grant
Warnings/Content: Angst, drinking, forgiveness
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Fitz can't leave Grant standing on the doorstep in the rain. (Set post S4 finale, but before that future scene in the diner.)


Also at the Archive

Aftershock )

Title: Date Night
Fandom: Captain America
Rating: G
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Steve Rogers/Sam Wilson
Warnings/Content: Flirting, Sam showing off, Steve's notebook of modern facts
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Sam knows he's being ogled.

Also at the Archive

Date Night )

Title: Air Show
Fandom: MCU
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Steve/Bucky/Sam/Natasha
Warnings/Content:
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: After they've found Bucky, they need some time to hide out and recover. (Set after Winter Soldier, on the road trip that should have been.)

Also at the Archive

Air Show )
vass: Jon Stewart reading a dictionary (books)
([personal profile] vass Jul. 25th, 2017 10:50 pm)
Books

Read Ann Leckie's Provenance (in ARC. It's coming out on the 26th of September.) Spider mech, spider mech, does whatever a spider mech does. (Disconcert people, mainly.) This is in the same universe as the Radch trilogy, but in a different region and with different characters, voice, and tone. I have some friends who couldn't get into Ancillary Justice, wanted to like it but found it too hard going, and I would be curious if this one worked better as an entry point for them.

Leckie's repeatedly cited Cherryh as an influence, and if you think of the universe the Ancillary books are set in as like Cherryh's Alliance/Union universe, a big canvas covering a lot of territory in time as well as space, then this book in relation to its universe is a bit like a railway junction. It opens some new routes, introduces some new important players, but the most important universe-scale historical events (as opposed to system-scale or planet-scale or individuals) are offstage.

To say more about voice and tone: the Radch books are in first person, and that person is Breq, who is... Breq. Over two thousand years old, and even if you consider the destruction of Justice of Toren as a kind of rebirth, by the point we meet her she's a hypercompetent badass who's been surviving on her own in her single body for nineteen years. Also she's not a human, so there's that.

Ingray isn't Breq. She's very much human (and has an entirely reasonable terror of AIs,) a lot younger (I don't think her exact age is stated, but early twenties would be my guess,) and infinitely less sure of herself. She's also spent her entire life to date having her head messed with by her shitty family. My first two impressions, right from the first three chapters of this book, were: one, you can really tell the author was spending a lot of time in airports when she wrote this; and two, Ingray has the sort of family life where the closer your geographic proximity to your relatives, the more difficulty you have with being a decent person. The rest of this book bore this out (I mean the family, although there were definitely more airport-equivalent scenes too.)

If you're one of the people who disliked Breq because she was "too perfect" (I disagree with you about her being perfect, but) you might find Ingray and her smaller scale problems (compared to entire empires and species) more relatable.

If the Radch trilogy is about personhood and the fight to be recognised as a person when you don't fit a society's definition of who counts as a person, then Provenance about growing into oneself not as a person (that was never in question for Ingray) but as an adult (a coming of age that, by contrast, Breq never had the luxury of needing.) And if the Radch trilogy is about resisting societal/systemic forces, Provenance is about resisting social, personal pressures (family and peers.)

Finished Aliette de Bodard's The House of Binding Thorns. And after this and Provenance I'd like a short break from books about difficult family situations, please! I liked this better than The House of Shattered Wings, but the tone was still bleaker than I usually go for. Characters I particularly liked: Madeleine, back from the previous book; Thuan the dragon prince, and Berith and Francoise the Fallen/human couple trying to manage outside the Houses. Grandmother Olympe, the elder of the community where Berith and Francoise live, was also pretty great. And I warmed more to Asmodeus than I did in the first book.

Unfortunately, I think I'm the wrong audience for this. The things The House of Shattered Wings and The House of Binding Thorns do well (decayed elegance, gothicism, Paris, fallen angels), they do really well, but they're not things I particularly love (I don't dislike them, they're just not my catnip.) So, like, I can't actually rave about these books, but I do want to wave them really hard at people who do love those things.

Comics

Some zines I ordered from Rooster Tails's Etsy store showed up, and he kind of threw in a bunch of queer fanart glossy note cards (maybe to make up for a delay, idk, I'm not complaining!) and they're so beautiful and I didn't know I needed a picture of Daria holding Jane's hand and saying "I hate you the least," or adorably cartoony Finn smooching Poe, or cartoony Gabrielle climbing Xena like a tree, but I definitely did need those things. Now I'm trying to decide whether to keep or send to people.

The zines are #my gender is..., three tiny A6 cardbound volumes made in response to answers people gave the author when he asked people to fill in the blank.

Mainlined 17776, which is web based multimedia rather than comics, but I'm putting it in this category because what everyone's comparing it to is Homestuck. It's about satellites watching football in an unimaginably future, but also post-scarcity/post-singularity anxiety and Millennialism (as in epochs, as well as as in snake people) and play as the ultimate point of human existance, and it's funny and elegiac and cool and reminds me of David Foster Wallace in some ways.

That said, it is worth talking about who's at the centre of this narrative. No, not robots. No, not humans. Americans. White, suburban, minivan-driving, 80s-and-90s-born Americans. So conflated with the essential nature of humanity that they don't even notice they're doing it. Even the probes are two American probes and one European (but not Russian) one. I mean, Mangalyan does exist, you know? And so does Chang'e 2 and Kirari. And Libertad I and Fajr and... I mean, not all of those are still in space, or left Earth's orbit, but they could. Not to mention that it's science fiction and at the present date JUICE is still in development, why not a future Ghanaian or Iranian satellite mission? Which is not even my point, my point is that the regressive fantasy that the humans fall back into when faced with the crushing boredom of their eternal lives is... the 1960s and 1970s but without the race riots or Stonewall or Watergate.

It's still a good story/multimedia work/thing, and I still enjoyed it. I just... that particular nostalgic fantasy makes me very tired sometimes. And no, not tired in a way that makes me want to give up on the weary work of human endeavour/struggle/progress to take refuge in looking back down at the things that are really important to us/humanity, i.e. a sport which people in my country don't play.

TV and Movies

Watched the first episode of Black Sails. Was unimpressed. I hear it gets better, though. Flint's fury at the stolen log page reminded me of this.

Music

Gave my sister the Hamilton soundtrack for Christmas last year or her birthday this year (I forget which -- my gift-giving punctuality standards are seriously slipping at the moment.) Success: she's hooked. Very hooked.

Games

Third week of [community profile] hexarchate_rpg. So far haven't panicked and run away yet (me, not my character) so that's good.

Still playing Binding of Isaac. In one especially good run, I met Isaac's mother for the first time, and defeated her! Which meant that, next time I got to that level, defeating her led to having to climb into her womb and fight more monsters there. Which... is definitely a narrative choice a person could make.

Started playing Hexcells, a puzzle game; not to be confused with Hexels, a different puzzle game. The latter is like 2048 but in three directions not two; the former is kind of like a griddler/nonogram, but in three directions and its own specific language of clues. Played all the way through Hexcells, then started Hexcells Plus. Got the Perfectionist achievement for the original Hexcells. Then Hexcells Plus. Then started Hexcells Infinite, and am at 90% of that.

The problem with me and Hexcells is not the logic. I'm not super great at the logic, but with time and effort and occasional appeals to online walkthroughs I can succeed (usually by speaking the chain of logic out loud over and over because I can't hold the branches in my head long enough otherwise.) The problem is that that one of the achievements is to do all the games with zero (or only one) mistakes, and the way my brain works (or the way my working memory doesn't work) it's very easy for me to make one stupid error too many and ruin an hour of work. Which is really frustrating and upsetting. At least Hexcells Infinite lets you save your progress. The first two games didn't, so if you need a break before finishing the level, you have to leave the app open.

Garden

The compost bin is full. That took about three months to fill a 220L bin. I had to look up what one does once the bin's full. Leave it to cure for a month or so while starting a new bin, apparently. Or alternatively, lift the bin off the compost (it doesn't have a bottom) and set it down next to the compost, shovel whatever still looks like vegetable peelings and cat litter back into the bin, and use whatever just looks like soil to grow things. (But not herbs and vegetables, because this is cat litter compost, so it's contaminated with toxoplasmosis. This compost can nourish pretty flowers and Native Plants To Encourage Local Species.)

Food

Baked scones. Also tried out a couple of recipes from my long backlog of bookmarked Recipes To Try Someday:

- Jack Monroe's Queen of Hearts jam tarts recipe. Not too bad given how seldom I make pastry. If you have fifty grams of butter and a scant cup of plain flour and some jam, this is an okay thing to do with those ingredients, but the scones were better.

- AoM Bratwurst Sandwich. This contains one thing I eat normally (mustard), one thing I've had decades ago but haven't cooked with (bratwurst), and two things I hadn't had before (sauerkraut, pumpernickel.) The bratwurst and mustard and sauerkraut were good. The pumpernickel... yeah, no, next time I make this I'll just use a dark rye.

I could have adapted to the flavour, but its lack of structural integrity meant that according to the Earl of Sandwich litmus test this is not even a sandwich. (i.e. "I pretend I am the original Earl of Sandwich. I have asked for non-bread foods to be brought to me inside bread, that I might more easily consume them one-handed while gambling. This does not enable my wretched regency habits. This is not what I asked for. I do not deign to grace it with the name of my house.")

This would fall apart in his hand, scattering boiled rye grains all over his elaborate necktie and playing cards.

Admittedly, the degree of difficulty was higher for me since I had to eat it one-handed while fending off a very interested black and white cat with the other hand.

Other

Broke my daily meditation streak at 219 days. Very pissed off about it, in a not zen at all way. The last time this happened it was at 149 days. Forming habits is hard for me. (This is not a request for reassurance or advice. Especially not advice.) Took four days off meditating out of pique.

Cats

Have been fighting a lot these last few days. At first I thought Beatrice was the main instigator, but last night while she was aggressively licking Dorian, I saw him nip her.

He hasn't learned to lift the toilet lid yet, but it's hard for me to remember to leave it down since my already established habit was to close the door but leave the lid up.
vass: Icon of Saint Ignatius being eaten by lions (eaten by lions)
([personal profile] vass Jul. 23rd, 2017 03:33 am)
He's being a terrible Dory again. (Sung to the tune of 'I'm telling a terrible story' from The Pirates of Penzance.) This time his evidence exculpatory is that I won't let him use the indoor swimming pool. (No, not the sink. And I don't have a bathtub.)

So he learned to turn the lever sort of door handles and also swing on them in such a way that he can open an outward opening door from the outside. I am pondering technological solutions. I hear there's a form of child lock that works on cats. Until then I'm leaving the lid down and putting a barrier in front of the door, but I expect that won't hold him for long.
catness: (lazy)
([personal profile] catness Jul. 20th, 2017 07:14 pm)
#15. If not now, then when?

It depends. There are 2 different ways to approach something you want to happen. One, when it requires specific prerequisites, but they're all steps of an actionable plan. As long as you're working on the plan *now*, even if the start and the end of the chain seem to be worlds apart, you should be able to get from here to there, even though the precise definition of "when" is outside your control.

The second way, the easiest and hence my favourite, is to wait for "better times". It's comforting to answer "someday" to all such questions, but who am I kidding - in 99% of cases, these better times never come.

It's funny, though, how easy everything looks on the journal page. Pick your goals, write a plan, stick to it. Profit! I wonder why all perfectly good plans dissolve in mental fog and despair faster than you can summon a protective casing. How to work with such volatile material?
catness: (catblueeyes)
([personal profile] catness Jul. 19th, 2017 12:15 pm)
I've repeatedly observed that a reasonable quantity of alcohol ("reasonable" being the key) has a hugely beneficial effect on my character and behavior. It lowers inhibitions, self-doubts and risk aversion, and increases self-confidence, energy and optimism. (I'm not sure if the increase of energy is real or perceived. After all, isn't alcohol an opposite of caffeine?)

Case in question: yesterday about 23:30 I went to put my Pokémon into a gym located a couple of mins away from my home. (Just as planned, except that I meant to do it after 00:00, to let my enemies friends earn coins, but someone else took the gym before me.) Ended up doing a big round, covering 5 more gyms in the neighbourhood, walking for ~1 hour overall, without water, and dressed in a shabby T-shirt I never wear outside. Did I enjoy it? Absolutely. Did it still seem like a good idea in the morning? Absolutely (except for water, I should make a point of never going out without it in this weather). Would I do it sober? Only if previously planned (that's what I used to do before the gym overhaul), but not on the spur of the moment. Probably would've convinced myself that it doesn't make sense, and I have better things to do at home at this hour. (Sure, mashing buttons in the browser.)

In contrast, earlier that day I had declined a Tyranitar raid for perfectly rational reasons, fearing too much physical exertion with the risk of not making it there in time. I regret it ever since. Alcohol could've pushed me towards the right choice.

Of course, alcohol is infeasible as a continuous treatment, due to its multiple undesired side effects and overall unpredictability. Which poses a question: is it possible to emulate its positive effects without the usage of any potentially dangerous chemical substances, by the sheer effort of will? Could I ask myself the question "what would the drunk cat do?" and play along, even when it goes against all my instincts?
'We hear a great deal about the rudeness of the rising generation. I am an oldster myself and might be expected to take the oldsters' side, but in fact I have been far more impressed by the bad manners of parents to children than by those of children to parents. Who has not been the embarrassed guest at family meals where the father or mother treated their grown-up offspring with an incivility which, offered to any other young people, would simply have terminated the acquaintance? Dogmatic assertions on matters which the children understand and their elders don't, ruthless interruptions, flat contradictions, ridicule of things the young take seriously--sometimes of their religion--insulting references to their friends, all provide an easy answer to the question "Why are they always out? Why do they like every house better than their home?" Who does not prefer civility to barbarism?

If you asked any of these insufferable people--they are not all parents of course--why they behaved that way at home, they would reply, "Oh, hang it all, one comes home to relax. A chap can't be always on his best behaviour. If a man can't be himself in his own house, where can he? Of course we don't want Company Manners at home. We're a happy family. We can say anything to one another here. No one minds. We all understand."

Once again it is so nearly true yet so fatally wrong. Affection is an affair of old clothes, and ease, of the unguarded moment, of liberties which would be ill-bred if we took them with strangers. But old clothes are one thing; to wear the same shirt till it stank would be another. There are proper clothes for a garden party; but the clothes for home must be proper too, in their own different way. Similarly there is a distinction between public and domestic courtesy. The root principle of both is the same: "that no one give any kind of preference to himself." But the more public the occasion, the more our obedience to this principle has been "taped" or formalised. There are "rules" of good manners. The more intimate the occasion, the less the formalisation; but not therefore the less need of courtesy. On the contrary, Affection at its best practises a courtesy which is incomparably more subtle, sensitive, and deep than the public kind. In public a ritual would do. At home you must have the reality which that ritual represented, or else the deafening triumphs of the greatest egoist present. You must really give no kind of preference to yourself; at a party it is enough to conceal the preference. Hence the old proverb "come live with me and you'll know me". Hence a man's familiar manners first reveal the true value of his (significantly odious phrase!) "Company" or "Party" manners. Those who leave their manners behind them when they come home from the dance or the sherry party have no real courtesy even there. They were merely aping those who had.

"We can say anything to one another." The truth behind this is that Affection at its best can say whatever Affection at its best wishes to say, regardless of the rules that govern public courtesy; for Affection at its best wishes neither to wound nor to humiliate nor to domineer. You may address the wife of your bosom as "Pig!" when she has inadvertently drunk your cocktail as well as her own. You may roar down the story which your father is telling once too often. You may tease and hoax and banter. You can say "Shut up. I want to read". You can do anything in the right tone and at the right moment--the tone and moment which are not intended to, and will not, hurt. The better the Affection the more unerringly it knows which these are (every love has its art of love). But the domestic Rudesby means something quite different when he claims liberty to say "anything". Having a very imperfect sort of Affection himself, or perhaps at that moment none, he arrogates to himself the beautiful liberties which only the fullest Affection has a right to or knows how to manage. He then uses them spitefully in obedience to his resentments; or ruthlessly in obedience to his egoism; or at best stupidly, lacking the art. And all the time he may have a clear conscience. He knows that Affection takes liberties. He is taking liberties. Therefore (he concludes) he is being affectionate. Resent anything and he will say that the defect of love is on your side. He is hurt. He has been misunderstood.

He then sometimes avenges himself by getting on his high horse and becoming elaborately "polite". The implication is of course, "Oh! So we are not to be intimate? We are to behave like mere acquaintances? I had hoped--but no matter. Have it your own way." This illustrates prettily the difference between intimate and formal courtesy. Precisely what suits the one may be a breach of the other. To be free and easy when you are presented to some eminent stranger is bad manners; to practice formal and ceremonial courtesies at home ("public faces in private places") is--and is always intended to be--bad manners. There is a delicious illustration of really good domestic manners in Tristram Shandy. At a singularly unsuitable moment Uncle Toby has been holding forth on his favourite theme of fortification. "My Father," driven for once beyond endurance, violently interrupts. Then he sees his brother's face; the utterly unretaliating face of Toby, deeply wounded, not by the slight to himself--he would never think of that--but by the slight to the noble art. My Father at once repents. There is an apology, a total reconciliation. Uncle Toby, to show how complete is his forgiveness, to show that he is not on his dignity, resumes the lecture on fortification.'

(From The Four Loves, by C. S. Lewis. Chapter 3: Affection.)
catness: (puzzle)
([personal profile] catness Jul. 18th, 2017 12:46 pm)
The Stanley Parable by Davey Wreden is a 3D 1st-person adventure game. Stanley is an office drone, happy with his mindless button-pushing job and with following the orders. But one day he finds himself alone - all his coworkers mysteriously disappeared, and he goes to investigate.

The game can be completed in a few minutes if the player, just like Stanley, follows the narrator's commands. But this is not the point of this game. You do not "play the game" but "play with the game", trying to disobey the narrator in various ways and to piss him off, which yields a lot of snarky comments and unlocks several different endings.

“The design document for [The Stanley Parable] was, ‘Mess with the player’s head in every way possible,'” says creator Davey Wreden, “throwing them off-guard, or pretending there’s an answer and then kinda whisking it away from in front of them.” [source: Wired.com]

When I had tried this game for the first time, I hated it, because I had expected a story, not a continuous argument with an annoying, condescending and easily angered guy. But now I don't take it so seriously, and it's quite amusing, hilarious at times (such as the "click on the door 5 times" achievement!) The story doesn't reach the emotional heights of The Beginner's Guide (the successor of Stanley Parable, by the same developer), but it also carries a message - the same message I keep seeing everywhere lately... about the importance of breaking away from the routine.

4/5 - an unusual "meta"-game, definitely not to everyone's liking, but worth a try.
catness: (cat_black)
([personal profile] catness Jul. 17th, 2017 07:50 pm)
I got a bad case of earworm. Now you can, too ;)



Ok, I hate this guy's bleating voice, and the words do not make much sense (at least in the 2nd version), but oh the music...

lyrics v1

lyrics v2
catness: (cat_black)
([personal profile] catness Jul. 17th, 2017 01:47 pm)
It's so amusing how people are madly enthusiastic about the new Doctor being female (and other people are aggravated by the same fact). It's almost like rooting for your team, where the team is defined by random circumstances of your birth. How come that your version of reproductive organs is your most important and defining feature? Why the hell should I care?

I'm curious how the new Doctor turns out, the same way I was curious about the previous new Doctors, but I refuse to see the unusual (for this role) gender as an automatic bonus (or disadvantage). Let's see her acting first. If she's even half as good as the other gender-swapped character (avoiding the spoilers just in case), and the writing is as good, it should be a success... but it remains to be seen.

I'm more concerned about the potential romance angle, as I suspect that the authors will not pass this opportunity for character development. And I hate it when an otherwise good show focuses on romance. (I dunno why? Because I can't fall in love anymore, so no one should? ;) Oh, I appreciate all violent and perverted fictional relationships, when the partners routinely try to kill each other, torture (for real, not BDSM games), Stockholm syndrome and such. (I happily ship Will/Hannibal ;) But I don't have high hopes on seeing anything that intense on Dr. Who.
catness: (Default)
([personal profile] catness Jul. 16th, 2017 02:17 pm)
#14. What is the difference between living and existing?

Excitement and/or goals. Ideally one should be excited about their goals, but one without the other can be very well worth it. Either pursuing your goals with grim determination, powered by pain and bitterness (sort of like Voldemort), or jumping from one random adventure to another for the sake of excitement alone - it's all good.

I guess the difference boils down to "active vs passive"? Of course, not every body movement counts as Action. Being stuck with a boring job pressing buttons on your superior's orders is very much non-living even if it involves hard work and you perform socially useful services, create socially useful products, provide for your family etc. (I'm playing Stanley Parable right now, which abundantly illustrates this idea ;) Clicking buttons in online games played out of habit and boredom - same thing, even though it looks like a fun activity at the first glance.

Yup, being mostly a zombie these days.
steorra: A cross that looks like a star, or vice versa. (christianity)
([personal profile] steorra Jul. 15th, 2017 10:57 pm)
On my way to work today I saw a bus stop ad that had the text of John 3:16, the verse reference, and the name/website of a church on it.

As church/Christian ads go, it's pretty good. (Much better than the one I used to see in Columbus that really bothered me. It had a bible reference - probably the 10 commandments - and the text "What part of 'Thou shalt not' did you not understand?" Really, is that the message you want to send people about God and Christianity?)

And I found myself thinking that treating John 3:16 as a key summary verse is very Protestant. Partly the focus on belief (not that belief is insignificant if you're Orthodox, but it's different), and partly the "God gave his Son" which seems to imply more emphasis on Christ's suffering/death than on his resurrection. (Again, not that the suffering and death are insignificant if you're Orthodox, but the emphasis is different.)

I'm not sure off the top of my head what one verse I would pick as an Orthodox summary verse. Partly I think Orthodoxy is less favourable to "use a verse to sum things up" than Protestantism is - so that even having a "quintessential verse" is a rather Protestant thing to do. But putting that aside, I think a better Orthodox summary verse could probably be found.
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